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Explore Town

Carnarvon

Visitor Centre:
Carnarvon Visitor Centre
11 Robinson Street, Carnarvon
Phone: 08 9941 1146
Fax: 08 9941 1149
Visitor website: www.carnarvon.org.au
General:
Carnarvon is almost as famous for the climate as it is for bananas.

The winters are glorious and although February and March can be very hot, the town is one of the coolest in the North West. Carnarvon is the commercial centre for the rich Gascoyne district. A feature of the town is the luxurious plantations of bananas and other tropical fruits, all grown with the aid of water pumped out of the sand of the Gascoyne River.

The plantations extend for 16km (10 miles) along the banks of the Gascoyne River. Besides bananas and mangoes, beans, tomatoes, melons, grapes, citrus and tropical fruits are also grown.
Other industries important to the district are wool production, prawn and scallop processing and solar salt extraction.
History:
Lighthouse Keepers Cottage Museum

The cottage was built around 1900 to house the lighthouse keeper and his family and used until the 1970’s. The building has now been restored and houses memorabilia from those bygone days.

One Mile Jetty

Walk or take the ‘Coffee Pot’ train out into the Indian Ocean on the historical One Mile Jetty, built in 1897. View the Gascoyne River mouth, mangrove and marine life, migrating birds and jetty activity. The Jetty is renowned for its great fishing with big catches of mulloway, tailor, snapper, bream, mackerel, tuna and shark. Also blue manna crabs from May to August. The jetty is being restored at a cost of over $2,500 for each pylon, with over 200 pylons being replaced. There is a nominal charge for using the jetty to help preserve it for everyone’s enjoyment.

Tramway and Town Walk Trail

A 2.5km walk trail runs the length of the tramway from the Heritage Precinct to the Town Bridge. Trains used to travel along here from the One Mile Jetty to the goods yard in town, where the Civic Centre Woolshed stands today. It is hoped in the future to run a replica of the Kimberley steam train along this route. The ‘Kimberley’ steam train is now housed in the Babbage Island railway station at the Heritage Precinct.

Shearing Hall of Fame

The Heritage Group in collaboration with The Gascoyne Pastoral and Shearing Museum Inc have opened Western Australia’s first Shearing Hall of Fame. Read about fast shearers and big sheds. Learn about the golden days of the Gascoyne shearing industry in the 1950’s.

HMAS Sydney II/HSK Kormoran Display

This famous Australian battle off the Gascoyne Coast in 1941 is remembered and told at the Heritage Precinct. Latest details from HMAS SYDNEY Search P/L are posted on a regular basis. View one of the lifeboats in which 57 German survivors came ashore north of Carnarvon.

Rocky Pool

This beautiful, deep, fresh water pool is situated 55kms east, on the Gascoyne Junction Road.

Pelican point

A popular swimming, windsurfing and fishing spot, 5kms from town. Turn from Robinson Street at Babbage Island Road. Boats for hire, chalets, waterside walking.

Bush Bay and New Beach

Both beaches are accessible from the Geraldton Road, the turn-off being approximately 25kms south of Carnarvon. Please note, these roads should be used with caution. There is safe swimming and good fishing at both beaches.

Town Beach

Situated near the centre of the town, this is a very popular swimming and picnic spot.

Blowholes

Located some 73kms from Carnarvon. The turn-off is 24kms north, then 49kms to the coast, on an all bitumen road.

The Blowholes is an area well worth a visit. A powerful jet of water is forced with terrific pressure through a hole in the rock, sometimes to a height of 20 metres.

One kilometre south of the Blowholes lies a splendid beach, protected by a coral reef; contains tropical fish and shells. Camping is permitted, but there is no fresh water.
Warning: Parts of the area can be dangerous. Keep a wary eye on the tides and beware of king waves.

Pioneer Park

A pleasant picnic spot with swings for the children. Two enormous Blue Whale bones form an arch over the entrance.

Bibbawarra Bore

Located 16 km north, this hot water bore can best be reached via the Miaboolya Beach crossing. Originally bored for coal in 1905, the bore, 914 metres deep, produces a continuous flow of hot water. The water temperature is 65 degrees centigrade.

Warning: Keep children and pets away from hot water to avoid scalding.

Chinaman's Pool

Originally a watering place for the town. This is a permanent pool and a lovely spot for picnics.

Miaboolya Beach

Proceed as to Bibbawarra Bore and turn left at the sign. Distance from Carnarvon is 22km. Proceed with caution after rain. Long sandy free beach. Excellent fishing, both light and heavy line.

Fishing Spots

The main Carnarvon Jetty provides the opportunity to catch mulloway, tailor and shark all year round, mackerel and tuna in summer, bream in winter and blue manna crabs from May to August. Small whiting and flathead are abundant in the incoming tides of Bush Bay and New Beach. The Blows coastline can be relied on for big fish, such as snapper, mackerel and cod. One can confidently fish in any of the waters around Carnarvon.

Industry

The Carnarvon Plantation Industry is of considerable State importance, as 15% of its vegetables and 60% of its bananas are consumed in WA.
The pastoral industry properties are usually very large, sheep being more common than cattle, though the latter are assuming greater importance.

The Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum

The Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum celebrates the little known history of the role Carnarvon played in the manned space program and in the Australian communications industry. The museum focuses on two parts. The Tracking Station and the OTC Satellite Earth Station, each station played separate roles in the early space industry.
The Tracking Station was built to support NASA’s Gemini, Apollo and Skylab programs and was commissioned in 1964 and operated for 11 years. It was the last station to communicate with the space capsules leaving the earth orbit, and the last to make contact before splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. At the height of the operation it had a staff of 220.
The OTC Satellite Earth Station (and now museum site) was opened in 1966, initially with the 12.8 metre wide Casshorn antenna as part of the global satellite communications system. Later in 1969, the larger 29.6 metre wide steerable antenna was built to facilitate better communication between the NASSA Tracking Station and the USA.
The museum is open daily from 10 am to 3 pm during tourist season and until 1 pm in the off season. Closed between Christmas and New Year.

Station Stays

There are many stations throughout the Gascoyne that cater for the tourists. If you wish to see an outback cattle or sheep station take advantage of the station stays offered. You will see how a station is run while enjoying the comfortable accommodation and wholesome home cooking prepared by your hosts. Some stations offer personalised tours or will provide directions on where to explore some of the most beautiful country
in Australia.

Markets

Every Saturday morning busy plantation owners bring their produce into the town centre for direct sale to the public. Not to be missed the markets run May to October only.

The Plantations

Take the South River Road, leading off the highway 4kms The people are very friendly but busy, some advertise produce and sell direct to the public.
A round trip can be made by continuing over the bridge and taking the North River Road, returning over the Miaboolya Crossing. Sometimes closed due to erosion - best to check first!

Attractions:
Lighthouse Keepers Cottage Museum

The cottage was built around 1900 to house the lighthouse keeper and his family and used until the 1970’s. The building has now been restored and houses memorabilia from those bygone days.

One Mile Jetty

Walk or take the ‘Coffee Pot’ train out into the Indian Ocean on the historical One Mile Jetty, built in 1897. View the Gascoyne River mouth, mangrove and marine life, migrating birds and jetty activity. The Jetty is renowned for its great fishing with big catches of mulloway, tailor, snapper, bream, mackerel, tuna and shark. Also blue manna crabs from May to August. The jetty is being restored at a cost of over $2,500 for each pylon, with over 200 pylons being replaced. There is a nominal charge for using the jetty to help preserve it for everyone’s enjoyment.

Tramway and Town Walk Trail

A 2.5km walk trail runs the length of the tramway from the Heritage Precinct to the Town Bridge. Trains used to travel along here from the One Mile Jetty to the goods yard in town, where the Civic Centre Woolshed stands today. It is hoped in the future to run a replica of the Kimberley steam train along this route. The ‘Kimberley’ steam train is now housed in the Babbage Island railway station at the Heritage Precinct.

Shearing Hall of Fame

The Heritage Group in collaboration with The Gascoyne Pastoral and Shearing Museum Inc have opened Western Australia’s first Shearing Hall of Fame. Read about fast shearers and big sheds. Learn about the golden days of the Gascoyne shearing industry in the 1950’s.

HMAS Sydney II/HSK Kormoran Display

This famous Australian battle off the Gascoyne Coast in 1941 is remembered and told at the Heritage Precinct. Latest details from HMAS SYDNEY Search P/L are posted on a regular basis. View one of the lifeboats in which 57 German survivors came ashore north of Carnarvon.

Rocky Pool

This beautiful, deep, fresh water pool is situated 55kms east, on the Gascoyne Junction Road.

Pelican point

A popular swimming, windsurfing and fishing spot, 5kms from town. Turn from Robinson Street at Babbage Island Road. Boats for hire, chalets, waterside walking.

Bush Bay and New Beach

Both beaches are accessible from the Geraldton Road, the turn-off being approximately 25kms south of Carnarvon. Please note, these roads should be used with caution. There is safe swimming and good fishing at both beaches.

Town Beach

Situated near the centre of the town, this is a very popular swimming and picnic spot.

Blowholes

Located some 73kms from Carnarvon. The turn-off is 24kms north, then 49kms to the coast, on an all bitumen road.

The Blowholes is an area well worth a visit. A powerful jet of water is forced with terrific pressure through a hole in the rock, sometimes to a height of 20 metres.

One kilometre south of the Blowholes lies a splendid beach, protected by a coral reef; contains tropical fish and shells. Camping is permitted, but there is no fresh water.
Warning: Parts of the area can be dangerous. Keep a wary eye on the tides and beware of king waves.

Pioneer Park

A pleasant picnic spot with swings for the children. Two enormous Blue Whale bones form an arch over the entrance.

Bibbawarra Bore

Located 16 km north, this hot water bore can best be reached via the Miaboolya Beach crossing. Originally bored for coal in 1905, the bore, 914 metres deep, produces a continuous flow of hot water. The water temperature is 65 degrees centigrade.

Warning: Keep children and pets away from hot water to avoid scalding.

Chinaman's Pool

Originally a watering place for the town. This is a permanent pool and a lovely spot for picnics.

Miaboolya Beach

Proceed as to Bibbawarra Bore and turn left at the sign. Distance from Carnarvon is 22km. Proceed with caution after rain. Long sandy free beach. Excellent fishing, both light and heavy line.

Fishing Spots

The main Carnarvon Jetty provides the opportunity to catch mulloway, tailor and shark all year round, mackerel and tuna in summer, bream in winter and blue manna crabs from May to August. Small whiting and flathead are abundant in the incoming tides of Bush Bay and New Beach. The Blows coastline can be relied on for big fish, such as snapper, mackerel and cod. One can confidently fish in any of the waters around Carnarvon.

Industry

The Carnarvon Plantation Industry is of considerable State importance, as 15% of its vegetables and 60% of its bananas are consumed in WA.
The pastoral industry properties are usually very large, sheep being more common than cattle, though the latter are assuming greater importance.

The Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum

The Carnarvon Space and Technology Museum celebrates the little known history of the role Carnarvon played in the manned space program and in the Australian communications industry. The museum focuses on two parts. The Tracking Station and the OTC Satellite Earth Station, each station played separate roles in the early space industry.
The Tracking Station was built to support NASA’s Gemini, Apollo and Skylab programs and was commissioned in 1964 and operated for 11 years. It was the last station to communicate with the space capsules leaving the earth orbit, and the last to make contact before splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. At the height of the operation it had a staff of 220.
The OTC Satellite Earth Station (and now museum site) was opened in 1966, initially with the 12.8 metre wide Casshorn antenna as part of the global satellite communications system. Later in 1969, the larger 29.6 metre wide steerable antenna was built to facilitate better communication between the NASSA Tracking Station and the USA.
The museum is open daily from 10 am to 3 pm during tourist season and until 1 pm in the off season. Closed between Christmas and New Year.

Station Stays

There are many stations throughout the Gascoyne that cater for the tourists. If you wish to see an outback cattle or sheep station take advantage of the station stays offered. You will see how a station is run while enjoying the comfortable accommodation and wholesome home cooking prepared by your hosts. Some stations offer personalised tours or will provide directions on where to explore some of the most beautiful country
in Australia.

Markets

Every Saturday morning busy plantation owners bring their produce into the town centre for direct sale to the public. Not to be missed the markets run May to October only.

The Plantations

Take the South River Road, leading off the highway 4kms The people are very friendly but busy, some advertise produce and sell direct to the public.
A round trip can be made by continuing over the bridge and taking the North River Road, returning over the Miaboolya Crossing. Sometimes closed due to erosion - best to check first!