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Kakadu National Park

Visitor Centre:
Bowali Information Centre
Phone: 08 8938 1120
General:
Seasons:
The Aboriginal people recognise 6 distinct seasons. In the Gun-djeihmi language, they are
Gunumeleng (Goonoomeleng) Oct-Dec pre monsoon hot becoming humid
Gudjewg (Goodjoog) Jan-March the true wet season
Banggerreng (Bungerreng) April clear skies and strong winds.
Yegge (Yeggear) May-June cool, low humidity
Wurrgeng (Whirrgeng) June-Aug cold weather time, days 30C nights 17C
Gurrung (Gooroong) Aug-Oct hot dry season.

Landscape:
Covering 20,000 square kilometres, the landscapes are very diverse, ranging from coastal sand dunes and tidal flats to elevated rocky creeks and plunging waterfalls. Rainforest, wetlands, huge tidal rivers and massive vertical cliffs help to frame the physical aspect of Kakadu, the only Park in the world which completely encompasses a major and untamed river system - The South Alligator.
The bedrock underlying the sandstone plateau in the east of the Park is approximately 1.6 billion years old - too old to contain fossils. An extensive eco-system has evolved in the region and the Park is home to 290 species of birds, 75 of reptiles, 60 of mammals, 10,000 insects and 1,600 plant species.

High temperatures and intense tropical light drives most animals into hiding, though birds are still prolific during daylight hours.

In the vast wetlands huge flocks of waterfowl assemble. At Yellow Water and Mamukala, Pied Geese and ducks form dense flocks, also Spoonbills, Brolgas, Jabiru and Glossy Ibis are common.

52 species of fish, ranging from tiny freshwater Blue Eyes to 8kg Salmon Tailed Catfish have been identified. The Barramundi that can weigh up to 20kgs is much pursued as a sport and table fish.

Tourism Features:
The Aboriginal culture of Kakadu is recognised as one of the great attractions. There is no better way to see the landscape than through the eyes of the local people.

Centrally located, Jabiru provides for all traveller’s needs. A wide range of experiences has been developed, ranging from luxury transport and accommodation, to rustic travel and camping options.

The wild climatic swing from the wet to the dry season changes access options. In the Dry approximately 40 places can be visited, most accessible by car. Improved roads also provide access to some of the main features in the wet.
Nourlangie Rock is almost always accessible to all vehicles.

Yellow Water continues to operate tours on Australia’s premier flooded wetland destination during the wet.

Magela Creek tour takes you on a boat trip part way to the Ubirr rock art site. Ubirr is at its best in the wet.

Scenic flights over Kakadu in the wet are sensational.

The Yurmikmik Walk in the south gives access to several small, but beautiful waterfalls.

For enthusiastic walkers there are extensive networks of long distance walking trails in remote areas of the Park’s south.

To avoid disappointment during the busy dry season it is wise to book accommodation and tours well in advance by contacting the companies appearing on these pages.

Time is the travellers biggest enemy in Kakadu. The park is large so allow time to feel the warmth and spirit of the land. Once this connection is made, memories of Kakadu will last a lifetime. Savour “The Kakadu Experience”.

For enthusiastic walkers there are extensive networks of long distance walking trails in remote areas of the Park’s south.

To avoid disappointment during the busy dry season it is wise to book accommodation and tours well in advance by contacting the companies appearing on these pages.

Time is the travellers biggest enemy in Kakadu. The park is large so allow time to feel the warmth and spirit of the land. Once this connection is made, memories of Kakadu will last a lifetime. Savour “The Kakadu Experience”
History:
The name Kakadu is from the Gagudju speaking people, a language used in the northern parts of the area at the beginning of the 20th century. Today there are three major languages spoken within the park, Gundjeihmi/Mauali, Jawoyn and Kunwinjku. Few places on earth can claim uninterrupted occupation for some 50,000 years. Illustrations of this lavish history adorn countless caves and rock shelters, Kakadu contains in excess of 5,000 recorded art sites.

At Ubirr, Nourlangie Rock and Nangaluwur a huge array of Aboriginal rock art can be viewed. Dating back 25,000 years it’s the longest continuous artistic tradition in the world.